Breed of the Week: Kuvasz

kuvasz

Meet our lovable and courageous gentle giant breed this week, the Kuvasz! These big hairy dogs have a naturally sweet temperament and love to be around the people their family. Although having a Kuvasz may mean a lot more hair in your house, they make it all worth it with their wonderful personalities!

 

The Kuvasz is a very old breed originating from Hungary. Original Kuvasz’s were much larger than the ones we see today. During the 14th century, only royalty were allowed to own a Kuvasz. They became very popular with royals who enjoyed hunting game, as the Kuvasz was a great hunting companion. As time passed, the Kuvasz started to become more accepted for common-folk to own. Farmers were big fans of the Kuvasz as they made fantastic guard dogs for sheep and livestock. The breed continued to be used as a guard dog for livestock all throughout the 1900’s. This breed makes an excellent guard and watch dog as his size alone can be quite intimidating. They have a very loud and deep bark (but they only make noise when necessary) and they are naturally very wary of strangers.

 

Kuvasz today are smaller in size compared to their ancestors, but still remain to be known as a gentle giant. They absolutely love their family and are very loyal dogs. Kuvasz’s do have a tendency to be wary of strangers still, just like their ancestors; be sure to do a lot of socialization with them so they know not to be aggressive or fearful towards strangers. Although they may seem big and tough, they are sensitive dogs and respond best to positive training as opposed to any gimmicks or harsh training methods. Most Kuvasz’s are great with other dogs and pets, but some can be very nervous or anxious around them, so it is extremely important before deciding to get this breed, that you have committed to training and socializing your Kuvasz for the rest of this life (not just while he’s a puppy!).

 

The Kuvasz sheds quite a bit and also is prone to mats with that thick double coat of his. Be sure to brush him with a good quality slicker brush 3-4 times a week to keep his coat looking its best. They will also need to see the groomer for hair clipping on a regular basis. They amount of time in between grooms depends on the individual dog as well as how long the owner prefers to keep the hair, but generally every 4-6 months.

 

Kuvasz are great family dogs and will always stay loyal to their family. Although very bonded to ‘his people’, Kuvasz don’t typically have much separation anxiety. To keep him from developing separation anxiety, make sure to not make a big deal about leaving or coming home, wait until your dog is calm before giving attention and affection. The Kuvasz may not be for everyone as this breed generally needs continuous training and socializing throughout most of his life. But if you are looking for a wonderful and outdoorsy companion, the Kuvasz might be the right dog for you!

Breed of the Week: Jack Russell Terrier

jack russell terrier

Our energetic featured breed this week is the rough and tumble Jack Russell Terrier! This little guy is the epitome of a big dog personality in a little dog body. This breed is packed full of self-confidence and they are almost always on a mission; whether it be to chase a squirrel up a tree or playing a game of fetch with their owner, they are their happiest when they have a task at hand!

 

The Jack Russell breed was developed in the early 1800’s. Everything about the Jack Russell tells you they were specifically bred to be the best fox hunters. They are fast and muscular, able to chase a fox without slowing down. Their bodies are compact and flexible so that they can easily get into burrows or hollowed out logs with no problem; wherever a fox can go, the Jack Russell can follow. Being used for so long as fox hunters, this breed is well known even today for their high energy and stamina.

 

The Jack Russell is a highly active dog and needs an owner who enjoys going for long walks and hikes. It is also a good idea to get your Jack Russell Terrier involved in agility competitions, the breed typically excels at these events and it’s a great outlet for all that energy! Consistency is key when training your Jack Russell, you want to make sure he knows you mean what you say. Jack Russell Terriers are intelligent dogs, if you ask them to sit and they ignore you and walk away, they will learn they don’t need to do anything you ask of them. You should always follow through on any command, and if they walk away it is best to leash them, bring them back to the training area and continue the session so they learn they can’t ignore your commands. Jack Russells can definitely be a bit stubborn and have a mind of their own so they require an owner is not only consistent but also patient.

 

The Jack Russell Terrier breed requires very little grooming. Their coat can come in almost any colour, and they have three different coat types: smooth, broken and rough. The smooth and broken coat types do not require any trimming, but the rough coat should be brushed once every two weeks or so and go to the groomer every couple of months. The smooth coat is short hair, smooth to touch and sits flat on the body. The broken coat is similar to the smooth coat but can have a few spots anywhere on the body that has longer hair and feels coarse. The rough coat is all over longer hair that feels coarse.

 

The Jack Russell Terrier is a perfect match for someone who has an active lifestyle, but can also be calm and consistent. With a Jack Russell you will never be bored because they are always up to something! And if you’re ever in the mood to play Frisbee, they will always be right there for you and ready to go!

Importance of Keeping Your Dog’s Ears Clean

flapping ears

We all know how important it is to keep our own ears clean to prevent things like infections or hearing loss. It is just as important that we keep our dogs ears clean! We want to make sure our dogs stay happy and healthy; one way to do so is by keeping their ears free of potentially harmful dirt and germs!

 

Unless you have a very talented dog, it’s likely that he can’t keep his own ears clean. So it is up to you to take a look in his ears every so often to make sure there’s no junk or signs of irritation. Dogs (especially ones with long floppy ears) are bound to get dirt, mud, grass, etc., in their ears at some point. Most of it flies out when the dog shakes his head, but to ensure it’s clean, have him sit down for you so you can take a good look in his ears. You want to look out for dirt, excess build-up of ear wax, anything lodged in the ear, redness or lots of scratches.

 

The most noticeable signs if your dog’s ears are really bothering him are excessively shaking his head, leaning his head to one side, scratching the ear excessively and whining or whimpering when someone touches the ear. If you notice any of these signs, it is best to have your vet take a look at the ears as these symptoms generally don’t show up until an infection has taken place and needs antibiotics. To ensure it doesn’t get to the point of infection, you want to use vet approved dog ear wipes to wipe the outside area of your dog’s ears (don’t try to force it too deep in the ear!), this should be done every other day or so.

 

Be aware that the tools we use to clean our ears should never ever be used on your dog’s ears. Q-tips can easily damage delicate areas in your dog’s ear. It is best to have your vet show you how to properly wipe your dog’s ears so that you are gentle but also effective at remove excess dirt or wax. Your vet will likely recommend pet wipes using all natural ingredients so it will help soothe your dog’s ears and not irritate them with harsh chemicals.

 

So when your dog is rolling in the grass and getting his ears dirty, you can worry a bit less now that you know what signs and symptoms of ear irritation to watch out for. With daily ear checks and as needed ear cleanings with pet safe wipes, you dog will have sparkling clean ears!

Breed of the Week: English Toy Spaniel

english toy spaniel

Meet our cute and affectionate featured breed of the week, the English Toy Spaniel. This breed loves spending time playing and cuddling with their owner and rarely leave their side. They can be surprisingly reserved with strangers as they are very picky about who they give their affection to. One of the typically quieter toy breeds, the English Toy Spaniel can be a great addition to almost any family and living space.

 

For a breed that’s been around for so many years, it’s amazing how well-documented their history is. During the 16th century, ‘exotic’ type lapdogs were all the rage. During this time, the English Toy Spaniel was developed with it’s immediate ancestors being the Pekingese and Japanese Chin. Many artists during the 16th century loved painting the English Toy Spaniel with their very easy-going personality, they aren’t your typically high-energy small dog and generally prefer to just lounge around most of the day (making it much easier to paint!). This breed goes by many other unofficial names such as Toy Spaniel, King Charles Spaniel (different from the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, and ‘Charlies’ (after King Charles I and II who both favoured this breed).

 

‘Charlies’ are not high-energy dogs, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t speedy! Although they prefer to lounge around, they absolutely love to chase things that move fast. If a butterfly happens to catch your Toy Spaniel’s attention, they’re off on the hunt in a second! They can get along well other pets and young kids as long as they’ve been introduced early and well-socialized. English Toy Spaniels can be goofballs and have tons of affection to give, but they are very picky who deserves their affection. You will find this breed likes to pick favourites amongst the people he meets and only those people will see the Toy Spaniels more outgoing side.

 

English Toy Spaniels are great dogs for first time owners. They are fairly easy to train (albeit a little stubborn at times) and will really work hard to please the people they are bonded to. They don’t require much exercise, but are also more than willing to go on a hike with you! Anything you are planning for the day, the Toy Spaniel wants to come with you! They do well in almost any living situation, they are small enough for apartment living and are very adaptable dogs. They only thing they don’t adapt well to is being left home alone all day as they crave attention from their favoured human companion.

 

This breed needs a lot of maintenance to keep looking their best. With their short muzzles, their faces are perfect places to gather up dirt and debris, so it will need to be wiped daily and after romping around in the garden! They need to be brushed about twice a week to prevent matting in their hair. They should go to the groomer for hair trimming once every 2-3 months. Especially in colder weather, when the hair on their feet and legs gets too long, water will freeze on that fur and can contribute to frostbite. In hot weather, the same area of fur can develop tangles covered in mud and dirt and be very uncomfortable and cause skin irritation if the hair is not kept trimmed.

 

‘Charlies’ can be a perfect companion dog for a first time owner, especially for people living on their own as English Toy Spaniels like to pick one person to give all their love to. With their easy-going and gentle nature, they are great company to bring to pet-friendly offices. They rarely bark and prefer and slower, quieter lifestyle. If you’re looking for an adaptable and loving small dog, consider the distinguished and sweet natured English Toy Spaniel!

Preventing Joint Problems In Dogs

senior dog with ball

If you’ve ever owned a large breed dog, you’re probably familiar with how common it is for large dogs to develop joint problems. Many of us don’t realize when our dog has joint problems until it has progressed to the point of them needing medication. So we’ve put together some helpful tips to preventing joint problems so that hopefully your dog won’t have trouble getting around when he gets older!

 

 

Ensure Minor Injuries Get Proper Rest

If puppies have a big fall, tumble down some stairs, etc., they need the proper time to fully heal. Ideally the fall should try to be avoided completely, but puppies will be puppies! After the injury, make sure to limit your pup’s activity until the injury is fully healed. For minor injuries that don’t require a vet visit, you can still call your vet and describe the situation so he can give you a general time to keep the pup on a lower activity level. Injuries that don’t get proper time to heal will often leave the joints weakened and can mean joint issues later on in life for your pooch.

 

Keep Your Dog Active!

Dogs that are carrying extra weight are putting more pressure on their joints when they walk around. This speeds up the deterioration of joint cartilage which can’t be reversed. Keeping your dog slim by giving him regular walks, not too many treats and a wholesome diet will help keep him moving around easily and not put additional pressure on his joints.

 

Early Detection

One of the best ways to ensure that your dog is comfortable moving around and not in any pain is to know the warning signs of early arthritis and sore/weak joints. Taking notice of things like, stiffness when standing up if lying down for a while, limping when walking or after a certain amount of walking, whining or whimpering when doing certain movements. These could all possibly be signs of early joint deterioration. If you start to notice any of these signs, be sure to speak with your vet on how to make your dog more comfortable and if he/she recommends any dietary supplements to help reduce inflammation in the joints.

 

Although arthritis and other joint problems cannot be reversed, and can be hard to avoid, they can definitely be slowed down. With help from you and looking out for any warning signs of joint pain, your dog can live a long happy life!

Breed of the Week: American Foxhound

american foxhound

The American Foxhound is one of the oldest American Dog Breeds. Although not a suitable apartment dog, this breed is a fantastic hunter as well as a gentle and easy-going cuddler!

 

The American Foxhound breed was developed in the late 1700’s, but the ancestor breeds (various other hound-type dogs) were brought over to America in the early 1600’s. The American Foxhound that we recognise today, was bred in Virginia, so it is no wonder that it is the state’s official dog breed! The breed was specifically bred to hunt foxes, often the American grey and red foxes. Today, the breed is still almost always used as a working dog. Either helping on the farm carrying heavy loads for the farmer (as this breed has a lot of strength and stamina), as hunting companions (used for tracking foxes), or competing in scent detection trials. This breed hates to be bored so it is best to only get this dog if you have a routine job for them to do.

 

Being a hound, this breed will definitely alert you with that typically hound ‘baying’ whenever he hears a noise. For this reason (as well as their high energy level), this breed is not a good option for small living spaces. The American Foxhound gets very bonded to their owners and enjoy working side by side with them. This breed is typically standoffish with strangers, and should be socialized early to prevent any fear or aggression towards strangers. They typically get along great with young kids, they can get along with other pets such as cats when heavily socialized to them, but they do have a prey drive so you should always use your best judgment.

 

They can be quite stubborn dogs when it comes to training. You should always stay calm, positive and patient with this breed. These dogs respond well to positive training methods, as well as they appreciate being given a reason to what you’ve asked of them. If you ask an American Foxhound to sit, they will look at you first almost like their asking “but why should I sit???? (usually cookies are a good enough reason!). Just be sure to not use too many training treats as this breed loves their food and can easily become overweight if not managed carefully.

 

Grooming needs for the Foxhound are very low maintenance. Being short-haired, they only require brushing maybe once a week. As they are often outdoors, they may need a few more wipe down than other dogs to keep them from tracking mud in the house!

 

The American Foxhound is a sweet and gentle breed, loyal to their family. They will spend all day outside if they are allowed, and their grooming needs are very low maintenance. Ensure that they don’t pig out on too many cookies and that they are getting enough exercise so that your Foxhound stays happy and healthy!