Breed of the Week: Kuvasz

kuvasz

Meet our lovable and courageous gentle giant breed this week, the Kuvasz! These big hairy dogs have a naturally sweet temperament and love to be around the people their family. Although having a Kuvasz may mean a lot more hair in your house, they make it all worth it with their wonderful personalities!

 

The Kuvasz is a very old breed originating from Hungary. Original Kuvasz’s were much larger than the ones we see today. During the 14th century, only royalty were allowed to own a Kuvasz. They became very popular with royals who enjoyed hunting game, as the Kuvasz was a great hunting companion. As time passed, the Kuvasz started to become more accepted for common-folk to own. Farmers were big fans of the Kuvasz as they made fantastic guard dogs for sheep and livestock. The breed continued to be used as a guard dog for livestock all throughout the 1900’s. This breed makes an excellent guard and watch dog as his size alone can be quite intimidating. They have a very loud and deep bark (but they only make noise when necessary) and they are naturally very wary of strangers.

 

Kuvasz today are smaller in size compared to their ancestors, but still remain to be known as a gentle giant. They absolutely love their family and are very loyal dogs. Kuvasz’s do have a tendency to be wary of strangers still, just like their ancestors; be sure to do a lot of socialization with them so they know not to be aggressive or fearful towards strangers. Although they may seem big and tough, they are sensitive dogs and respond best to positive training as opposed to any gimmicks or harsh training methods. Most Kuvasz’s are great with other dogs and pets, but some can be very nervous or anxious around them, so it is extremely important before deciding to get this breed, that you have committed to training and socializing your Kuvasz for the rest of this life (not just while he’s a puppy!).

 

The Kuvasz sheds quite a bit and also is prone to mats with that thick double coat of his. Be sure to brush him with a good quality slicker brush 3-4 times a week to keep his coat looking its best. They will also need to see the groomer for hair clipping on a regular basis. They amount of time in between grooms depends on the individual dog as well as how long the owner prefers to keep the hair, but generally every 4-6 months.

 

Kuvasz are great family dogs and will always stay loyal to their family. Although very bonded to ‘his people’, Kuvasz don’t typically have much separation anxiety. To keep him from developing separation anxiety, make sure to not make a big deal about leaving or coming home, wait until your dog is calm before giving attention and affection. The Kuvasz may not be for everyone as this breed generally needs continuous training and socializing throughout most of his life. But if you are looking for a wonderful and outdoorsy companion, the Kuvasz might be the right dog for you!

Breed of the Week: Scottish Deerhound

scottish deerhound

Our featured breed this week is the majestic and always happy Scottish Deerhound. These long-legged dogs have a very quiet nature, they much prefer to avoid any chaos, and watch from a comfy couch instead!

 

The Scottish Deerhound breed dates back as far as the 13th century. Back then, only people who were Dukes or higher ranking could own this breed. During the 13th century there was a large decline of deer in England, most of them had migrated to the Scottish Highlands resulting in a very high concentration of deer in that area. The Scottish Deerhound breed was developed to help control the population of deer. These dogs are very long and lean, shaped almost to mimic the deer so that they could effectively track down, chase and hunt them. During the 18th century, breech-loading rifles gained popularity, and more and more deer hunters were using guns instead of depending so heavily on the Scottish Deerhound. During World War I, the breed almost became extinct, and they still remain to be recognised as a very rare breed.

 

The Scottish Deerhound is often described as graceful and undemanding. They are rarely ‘needy’ and generally don’t have many issues with separation anxiety.  An adult Scottish Deerhound is graceful and very fast. Although they can run like nobody’s business, they are also very comfortable and happy to lounge indoors on the couch with you. When they do get outside, make sure it is a very large area they can run around and that it is fully enclosed as reliable recall can sometimes be an issue with this breed. They need daily activity to stretch those legs and get out some energy.

 

Scottish Deerhound puppies and teens are often not as graceful as the adults. Similar to a young Great Dane, Scottish Deerhound puppies can be quite awkward when running and playing as they are still getting used to their very long legs. Scottish Deerhound pups need extra exercise for all that puppy energy, and they love to play with everyone!

 

Although very intelligent and a great natural temperament, the Scottish Deerhound can be a bit stubborn to train. They need someone who is very consistent and patient to help communicate what is expected of them. They require a lot of socialization around small animals otherwise they are often likely to chase small, fast moving animals (sometimes including small dogs and cats!).

 

With their wire-hair coat, they require brushing once or twice a week. They can easily get tangles in their hair after romping in the yard, and easy fix is to rub in some baby oil to help loosen any knots or tangles. They do require hair trimming, but they frequency will depend on each individual dog, typically every 3-6 months.

 

The Scottish Deerhound is a gentle quiet breed that loves to run fast. Although they may not always come back when called, they make great family pets and generally get along with everyone they meet. This majestic breed makes a wonderful addition to laid back families with lots of open, fenced in space to run around!

Breed of the Week: Yorkshire Terrier

yorkshire terrier

Meet our cute and fluffy, happy-go-lucky breed featured this week, the Yorkshire Terrier! More commonly known as a ‘Yorkie’, this little dog has a lot of personality and love to show the world.

 

Originating in Northern England, in a little county known as Yorkshire. In the 19th century there became a need for a very small dog that could fit into tight places to hunt rodents. To create such a breed, it involved breeding the Scottish terrier with the Waterside Terrier. The Waterside Terrier back then was a dog weighing about 10-12lbs (not to be confused with the Airedale Terrier which is sometimes also referred to as Waterside Terrier). Over many years, several other dog breeds were added to the bloodline such as the Dandie Dinmont Terrier and the Clydesdale Terrier until we eventually ended up with the wonderful Yorkie that we know and love today.

 

As with most terriers, the Yorkie can at times be a bit stubborn when it comes to training. Once they realize you have something they want (like a delicious treat!) they are usually pretty easy to win over. The personality of a Yorkie can vary and has a lot to do with their upbringing and early socialization. Some Yorkies are very outgoing, these are usually the ones running around in the mud, barking at his doggy friends while playing, and zooming across the yard with his tiny little legs. On the opposite side, some Yorkies can be quite reserved and prefer the richer things in life like having all of his meals warmed up for him, lounging on the chaise, and being carried around in a purse or fashionable dog bag.

 

Each personality type will come with its own delightful quirks, but also challenges. The more outgoing dog should have a heavy training focus on polite manners when playing with other dogs as they can sometimes become too ‘bossy’. The more reserved Yorkie personality should have a heavy focus on socialization with strangers as these dogs often have a more sheltered lifestyle where they don’t meet many new people. When they aren’t practising meeting people nicely on a regular basis, they can sometimes forget their manners.

 

The Yorkshire Terrier does require a lot of grooming maintenance, but lucky for you there isn’t too much to groom on their little bodies! They will need regular grooming appointments for hair trims as well as to be brushed daily. If you have a long-haired Yorkie (also known as ‘silk coat’), you will need to comb the hair once or twice every day to prevent knots and tangles. If your Yorkie is very active and likes to play outside a lot, it may be wise to keep his hair short to reduce the amount of tangles and dirt he gets in his fur. With short-haired Yorkies (soft coat), they only need to be brushed once every week or so.

 

The always stylish Yorkshire Terrier suits many different owners. With their small size, they easily adapt to small space living. They generally get along well with other pets, but need a lot of socialization early in life if they are to be living in close quarters with small animals such as rats and hamsters. With their cute little faces and constantly upbeat attitude, they can make a fantastic addition to almost any family!

Breed of the Week: Otterhound

otterhound

The big, friendly Otterhound is our featured breed this week! This large and very hairy dog loves to spend every minute of the day outdoors getting dirty and rolling in the mud. He’s a rugged and rambunctious dog that loves to play!

 

The Otterhound originated in England in the 1300’s. The breed was created to hunt otters (to stop the otters from taking all of the fish). A specialized breed was needed to hunt the otters as the dog needed good scent-tracking abilities, able to fight the otter (weighing upwards of 20lbs), and able to withstand the freezing waters that the otters were in. With the Otterhound being a very old breed, there is a lot of debate over their early history, particularly with the size and look of the original Otterhound. Some experts believe the Otterhound was simply a term used to describe any fierce scent-tracking dog able to hunt otters. Others believe the Otterhound was originally a terrier type breed rather than hound. Today, the Otterhound is considered a ‘Vulnerable Native Breed’ by the AKC (American Kennel Club). There are approximately 600 Otterhounds remaining in the world!

 

This breed was built to be outdoors! They do best in homes with lots of space to run around, making them great farm dogs! This friendly breed gets along great with other dogs, but is better with big dogs as the Otterhound may be inclined to chase small pooches due to their high prey drive. Otterhounds generally are born with a very easy-going and sweet personality, which is good as this breed is notoriously stubborn and often slow to train. They get along best with owners who have the mindset of ‘Dogs will be dogs!’. As long as this dog gets lots and lots of exercise, they rarely have anxiety or major behavioural issues. But one quirk this breed often has (especially if bored or lots of pent up energy) is baying. They have that distinctive hound ‘bay’ instead of a bark, and man are they ever loud!

 

Do you love brushing and bathing dogs in your free time? If you do, the Otterhound is perfect for you! This large dog has a lot of hair and needs frequent hair trimming, brushing and bathing. The Otterhound’s goal every day is to get as dirty as possible, so you will definitely need to be prepared for daily upkeep of their coat.

 

The Otterhound is suitable for very active and outdoorsy families or individuals. They are not recommended for homes with small children as young Otterhounds can be quite rambunctious and knock kids over. They need a very patient and consistent owner who is willing to take the time to train them and give them enough mental and physical stimulation (they were bred to be high-energy working dogs). This dog is definitely not suitable for small apartments or living in a busy city. They thrive on the outdoors and being too cramped will give you an unhappy Otterhound! If you’ve got lots of space, patience, and don’t mind a bit of a dirty house, the Otterhound could be your loving and playful companion!

Breed of the Week: Dandie Dinmont Terrier

dandie dinmont terrier

Here’s a breed most people haven’t heard of, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Known as the gentleman of the terrier group, this breed is very rare and it is a long and thorough process to own one of these dogs. Read on to find out why this dog is so rare and what differs them from the rest of the terrier group.

 

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is one of the oldest recorded breeds in the world, going back as far as the 1700’s. Originally bred in Scotland, the Dandie Dinmont would assist with hunts for badgers and otter. Remarkably, unlike many breeds we have today, the Dandie Dinmont from the 1700’s compared to the Dandie now, are almost completely identical. Breeders have worked very hard to maintain the high standards of this breed and ensure that they have the desired temperament and appearance.

 

The Dandie Dinmont was the first terrier recorded to be given a name, separating it from the other terriers. Up until then, all terrier-type dogs were simply just called terriers. In the early 1800’s, there was a novel written called ‘Guy Mannering’ by Walter Scott. Walter was a proud owner of several Dandie Dinmont Terriers and decided to include them in his novel. In ‘Guy Mannering’, one of the characters was named Dandie Dinmont and this character took his little tan and grey terrier dogs everywhere he went. When people read this book, they wanted their very own little Dandie Dinmont terrier too!

 

With new breeds on the rise, the Dandie became less and less popular to own as they were no longer the new craze. Die hard Dandie Dinmont enthusiasts and breeders have worked hard to keep this wonderful breed going, but even so, anyone looking to own a Dandie will likely have to purchase from a breeder in Scotland and be put on about a two year waiting list.

 

Although from the terrier group (who are known for their high energy), the Dandie is surprisingly low-key and with about two walks a day, he is quite content to spend the rest of his time on the couch. They get along amazingly with other dogs. Once they find a doggy friend they like, good luck calling him in for dinner! Dandie’s are big goofballs that love to play for hours upon hours.

 

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a non-shedding dog, but he will still require trips to the groomer to have his hair trimmed to the Dandie hair cut or for an all over shave. The Dandie hair cut leaves a large ‘topknot’ on the Dandie’s head (almost like he’s wearing a large hat!). Because this terrier is built with such short legs, their stomach is very low to the ground and will get dirty often! Be sure to always have some pooch shampoo stocked at home!

 

This little terrier is known for his ability to adapt too many different situations very easily. They aren’t fussy dogs, as long as they get time to run outside for a bit every day, they are quite content living in an apartment or condo.

 

If you’re ready to bring an easy going but playful dog into your home, be sure to get in touch with a Dandie Dinmont breeder or rescue! Although there may be a long wait time till your little guy comes home, it will be worth having this wonderful dog in your life!

Breed of the Week: Brussels Griffon

brussels-griffon

Have you ever noticed a furry, pug-looking dog at the dog park? Well you might have just seen our featured breed this week, the Brussels Griffon! Lot’s of personality, and hilarity packed into one little dog. These guys will surely make you laugh on a daily basis.

 

The Brussels Griffon originated in Belgium in the early 1800’s. They were owned by coachmen and used to hunt rodents in the stables were the coachmen kept their horses. They were cross-bred with the pug and a type of Belgian terrier. Later added to the mix was the King Charles Spaniel and the English Toy Spaniel. Once these secondary breeds were added to the making of the Brussels Griffon, it resulted in the many coat variations we see today in the Brussels Griffon.

 

The Brussels Griffon comes in many different colour variations such as beige, black, red and black & tan. They can have a smooth coat or a wire-coat. The smooth coat Brussels generally have shorter hair that is easy to maintain and requires minimal grooming. The wire-coat will need regular trips to the groomer for trimming. The classic Brussels Griffon haircut is a short body and head, with longer hair around their mouth making it look as though they have a beard.

 

This great little dog adapts well to any sort of housing. They do fine in apartments or condominiums, generally only needing one good walk a day along with bathroom breaks. The most important thing to these dogs is to be with their owner at all times. They adore humans, especially the ones they have bonded with and dislike being left alone (sometimes resulting in being destructive). Brussels Griffon owners would do well to not accidentally enforce their anxious tendencies such as a big, exciting reunion when coming home from work. Dog breeds who are more inclined to developing separation anxiety should always be greeted in a calm manner and even ignored until they have settled down. Responding to an anxious dog with excitement when you’ve been separated for a period of time can result in increasing their anxiety in the future.

 

These dogs can get along fantastically with other animals when properly socialized and are generally good with strangers. If you think you’re ready for a loving little bearded dog, consider bringing in the wonderful Brussels Griffon to your home!