Breed of the Week: Borzoi

Russian borzoi, greyhound dog standing. Outdoor shoot
Russian borzoi, greyhound dog standing. Outdoor shoot

The last couple of weeks we’ve enjoyed looking at some rough and tumble working dogs that aren’t afraid of getting muddy! This week we’re switching things up and looking at one of the most graceful dog breeds around, the elegant and swift Borzoi!

 

The Borzoi breed was created by Russian aristocrats looking to have a hunting companion type dog who was extremely fast and brave enough to hunt large animals such as wolves. There are rumors that this breed dates as far back as the 13th century! Because of their remarkable hunting skills, the Borzoi was originally known as the Russian Wolfhound and the name was changed to Borzoi in 1936. And very suitable that they changed the name as Borzoi in Russian actually means ‘swift’!

 

This graceful breed is certainly a wonder to watch when they’re in full gallop! Their strides are as if they are floating along and their long locks just flow in the wind! Many Borzoi owners compare their dog to a cat as they are so light on their feet you often can’t hear them walking through the house! They are the epitome of the ‘gentle giant’. They stand at about 2’2???-2’8??? and weigh around 100 lbs when fully grown. They very rarely bark, making them not so great guard dogs. They can be a bit standoffish with strangers and should be very well socialized with strangers and young kids. The Borzoi is not always a good match for a home with small animals as they do have a very high prey drive and will chase anything that moves fast.

 

The Borzoi’s long hair should be combed through about twice a week to prevent mats and knotting. Due to their super silky hair, dirt just rolls off of them so you don’t have to worry about frequent baths. Depending on your personal preference, you can keep the Borzoi’s coat short, or keep up with regular hair trimming every couple of months. Be sure to speak with your groomer about the proper tools/products to use on your dog, as the Borzoi do have some special requirements (for example, it is recommended to never use a slicker type brush on this breed as it can damage their skin and coat).

 

The Borzoi can be a fantastic companion for an active family with lots of fully fenced backyard space. A happy Borzoi is one that is running in the wind! They need a gentle and patient leader for their training as they are very sensitive dogs. It’s a pleasure watching these wonderful dogs frolic and play, they will make a wonderful addition to any outdoorsy families!

Breed of the Week: Italian Greyhound

italian greyhound

Meet our cute and tiny featured breed this week, the Italian Greyhound! This miniature pooch is super playful and gentle. When they aren’t cuddling up to you on the couch, you can find them bouncing around outside with pure joy!

 

The Italian Greyhound is the smallest of the sighthound group. The breed originated in Italy approximately 2,000 years ago when Italians started breeding naturally smaller greyhounds. Many experts will debate the origin of this dog actually dates back as far as 6,000 years ago as some drawings on ancient Egyptian tombs have depicted a small dog very similar in resemblance to the Italian greyhound. There is even rumor that an Italian greyhound looking dog was discovered in the remnants of the city of Pompeii. Being from the sighthound group, the Italian Greyhound’s original purpose was to hunt for small game.

 

With their natural hunting instincts, it’s easy to see why this dog will often chase anything that moves! The Italian Greyhound can be found either bouncing off the walls and wiggling his body like crazy, or nuzzled into a cozy blanket or lying in a sunspot. Because of their high energy spurts, you want to be sure to give your Italian Greyhound lots of time every day to run around outside and let lose some of that energy. Preferably with some doggie friends as the Italian Greyhound gets along amazingly with other dogs, they thrive having canine friends to play with.

 

Italian Greyhounds makes wonderful family pets and are very suitable for apartment or condo living with their small size (but be sure to get them out to run around every day!). They get along great with kids, and usually tolerant of young kids when socialized properly. As long as the young kids are polite and respectful to the dog, and know not to try to pick them up unexpectedly (Italian Greyhounds are very sensitive to touch and usually dislike being grabbed by surprise) They are very sweet and gentle dogs that also get along well with other pets such as cats. Much like cats themselves as they like to nuzzle up to a warm couch or sleep under a sun beam from the window. Italian Greyhounds will often perch themselves on top of a couch so they can look out the window, much like a cat. But make sure they don’t climb too high, this breed often suffers from broken legs from trying to jump across high places.

 

This breed is very easy to maintain their good looks. Being short-haired, you don’t need to worry about taking them to the groomer for hair trimming. Just basic maintenance grooming like teeth and ear cleaning, nail trimming, baths, etc. Although not hypoallergenic, they do shed very little so hair all over the house won’t be much of a problem.

 

Italian Greyhounds are a wonderful choice for a family pet and get along fantastically with other dogs. The have a contagiously happy and playful personality. If you’re looking for a cute little clown that’s also an expert cuddlebug, look no further than the Italian Greyhound.

Breed of the Week: American Foxhound

american foxhound

The American Foxhound is one of the oldest American Dog Breeds. Although not a suitable apartment dog, this breed is a fantastic hunter as well as a gentle and easy-going cuddler!

 

The American Foxhound breed was developed in the late 1700’s, but the ancestor breeds (various other hound-type dogs) were brought over to America in the early 1600’s. The American Foxhound that we recognise today, was bred in Virginia, so it is no wonder that it is the state’s official dog breed! The breed was specifically bred to hunt foxes, often the American grey and red foxes. Today, the breed is still almost always used as a working dog. Either helping on the farm carrying heavy loads for the farmer (as this breed has a lot of strength and stamina), as hunting companions (used for tracking foxes), or competing in scent detection trials. This breed hates to be bored so it is best to only get this dog if you have a routine job for them to do.

 

Being a hound, this breed will definitely alert you with that typically hound ‘baying’ whenever he hears a noise. For this reason (as well as their high energy level), this breed is not a good option for small living spaces. The American Foxhound gets very bonded to their owners and enjoy working side by side with them. This breed is typically standoffish with strangers, and should be socialized early to prevent any fear or aggression towards strangers. They typically get along great with young kids, they can get along with other pets such as cats when heavily socialized to them, but they do have a prey drive so you should always use your best judgment.

 

They can be quite stubborn dogs when it comes to training. You should always stay calm, positive and patient with this breed. These dogs respond well to positive training methods, as well as they appreciate being given a reason to what you’ve asked of them. If you ask an American Foxhound to sit, they will look at you first almost like their asking “but why should I sit???? (usually cookies are a good enough reason!). Just be sure to not use too many training treats as this breed loves their food and can easily become overweight if not managed carefully.

 

Grooming needs for the Foxhound are very low maintenance. Being short-haired, they only require brushing maybe once a week. As they are often outdoors, they may need a few more wipe down than other dogs to keep them from tracking mud in the house!

 

The American Foxhound is a sweet and gentle breed, loyal to their family. They will spend all day outside if they are allowed, and their grooming needs are very low maintenance. Ensure that they don’t pig out on too many cookies and that they are getting enough exercise so that your Foxhound stays happy and healthy!

Healthiest Dog Breeds: Part 1

dog doctor

When looking to get a new dog or puppy, one of the biggest concerns of many future pet parents, are the common health problems of the breed. Even when considering a mixed breed dog, it is important to be knowledgeable and aware of possible future health issues with each breed that make up your mutt. This week we will be listing some of our favourite dog breeds that are well-known for their lack of health issues, also taking into consideration a long life span and great quality of life.

 

Australian Cattle Dog

The Australian Cattle dog belongs to the herding dog group. A medium-sized dog weighing about 30-35lbs when full grown. This energetic dog loves the outdoors and running around with his doggy friends all day. This is a very ‘sturdy’ breed that has no problem running into thick forests or jumping into lakes and getting dirty. They have an average life span of 13 years, and with proper exercise and nutrition, often live well beyond that number. You may be surprised to find just how active these dogs remain even into their later years. Your 8 year old Australian Cattle Dog will likely still be running around just like he did as a puppy!

 

Border Collie

Another super healthy dog also belonging to the herding dog group, the Border Collie! They are very active dogs that need a lot of daily exercise to help keep them healthy and happy. They have an average lifespan of 12-14 years and a few minor health problems that may occur in their later years such as hypothyroidism and Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA). With proper care, many Border Collies live into their senior years without any major health problems. Many Border Collie breeders have taken special care and many years to help ensure their puppies are as healthy as possible. Most of the small health issues that can occur in Border Collies can be tested for as a puppy and prevented or controlled before they become adult dogs.

 

Havanese

The smallest breed on our list today, the cute and cuddly Havanese! This breed has an average lifespan of 12-14 years and have very few health problems. Typical health concerns for Havanese are deafness and elbow dysplasia, these problems usually only occur in older Havanese although some puppies may be born deaf. Unlike our breeds listed above, the Havanese only needs short daily walks. But make sure he does get those daily walks! Dogs who are overweight are more likely to develop elbow dysplasia with that extra weight they are carrying around. Also remember to feed your Havanese high-quality dog food that doesn’t contain too much protein as that can also lead to canine elbow dysplasia.

 

These wonderful dog breeds  are known for their health and high quality of life and with proper exercise and nutrition, you are sure to give your dog the best years he can possibly have!

Breed of the Week: Tibetan Spaniel

tibetan spaniel

Our confident, pint-sized breed this week is the adventurous Tibetan Spaniel. These furry little guys share their ancestors with Pekingese, Pug and the Japanese Chin. They are intelligent and very trainable dogs suitable to confident owners.

 

The Tibetan Spaniel breed originated in the Himalayan mountains of Tibet, approximately 2,000 years ago. They were used mostly as companion dogs for the Monks, but were also keen watchdogs. The Tibetan Spaniel would sit for hours on top of a hill near the monastery, and alert the monks by barking if they saw anyone coming.

 

Although with their history you may expect the Tibetan Spaniel to be somewhat of a guard dog, in reality they are all bark and (typically) no bite. They make great watch dogs and will do lots of barking to alert you, but a well-balanced Tibetan Spaniel should never show any signs of aggression even to strangers. Typically, these dogs are pretty aloof around new people, they really light up when their owners are around. They are very loyal dogs that love to spend time with the people they’ve bonded to. Much like cats, they quite enjoy looking out the window for hours at a time, just watching people walking by. Just be sure they don’t lie by the window all day! These little guys need daily walks just like any other dog. They don’t require a lot of exercise, but still need to be active every day for their physical and mental well-being.

 

With their flat faces, the Tibetan Spaniel is known as a brachycephalic breed. So be sure that they don’t over exert themselves or are out too long in hot weather as their short muzzles can make it difficult to breath under these conditions.

 

The Tibetan Spaniel is a very intelligent and confident breed and can sometimes be a little stubborn. They are also extremely sensitive and intuitive to their owner’s mood. With all of this in mind, their training sessions should be done with a lot of patience and consistency. Avoid using any harsh training methods with this breed. The best method for training a Tibetan Spaniel is to first spend quality time together and really strengthen your bond, this will make training sessions much more enjoyable and productive!

 

To maintain the natural beauty of the Tibetan Spaniel, the owner should never trim the dog’s hair, other than the feet. Brushing should be done weekly as well as combing out the finer hair on their face. Depending on your particular Tibetan Spaniel, if they have large facial wrinkles, ensure to keep these clean by wiping them out with a pet safe wet wipe.

 

These compact little companions make great additions to almost any family. With their small size, they are suitable for city living. Using gentle and consistent training, the Tibetan Spaniel can grow to be a well-mannered watchdog and family member.

Breed of the Week: German Shepherd- Best in Show!

german shepherd

The results are in! The winner of this year’s Westminster Dog Show is the German Shepherd! It’s no wonder this great breed took home the big title. Let’s take a closer look at what makes the German Shepherd such a stand out breed!

 

The German Shepherd breed was developed in Germany in the late 1800’s. They belong to the herding group as their original purpose was to guard and herd sheep. The original German Shepherd was very different looking to the Shepherd we know and love today. German Shepherds before World War II typically rough coats and short tails. By cross-breeding various sheep dog breeds in Germany, the German Shepherd was created with the intent to have a dog to guard sheep with very high stamina so they were able to herd sheep for longer periods of time (compared to the other sheep dogs at that time).

 

Being a working dog, German Shepherds should only go to suitable families or individuals that have active lifestyles and plan to train and be around their dog for a lot of the day. German Shepherds absolutely love spending time with their owners, so they would do great with an individual who can bring their dog to work. Being bred for high stamina, it can sometimes take a lot to tucker out these dogs, so be sure to switch it up and not let your Shepherd get bored! Go to the dog park one day, a hike the next, etc. It is also very important to give your German Shepherd mentally stimulating activities or problem-solving games as they are a fairly intelligent breed and are happiest when both their body and mind are tired.

 

The German Shepherd does require a lot of brushing to ensure his coat stays healthy and to help keep the fur off your couch! They have a thick double coat that sheds year round, a slicker brush is recommended for the German Shepherd to really get through that thick fur. Be sure to talk to your groomer before using the slicker brush, if used incorrectly it can scratch your dog’s skin. German Shepherds generally come in the black and tan colouring that you are probably most familiar seeing; but they can also come in many other colours such as all black, all white, or black and red.

 

The German Shepherd can get along great with young kids as well as other pets. Depending on their training and early socialization, most German Shepherds will get along with everyone and only a little standoffish with strangers. They do have protective instincts so they will act if they feel they or their family are being threatened.

 

The wonderful German Shepherd is one of the most recognisable breeds in the world. They can be a great family pet to an active family. Just as any dog breed, they need training and proper early socialization. The German Shepherd also requires lots of brushing (about 3-4 times a week). If you aren’t phased by all that brushing and are looking for a loving companion, the German Shepherd may be right for you!

Breed of the Week: Dandie Dinmont Terrier

dandie dinmont terrier

Here’s a breed most people haven’t heard of, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Known as the gentleman of the terrier group, this breed is very rare and it is a long and thorough process to own one of these dogs. Read on to find out why this dog is so rare and what differs them from the rest of the terrier group.

 

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is one of the oldest recorded breeds in the world, going back as far as the 1700’s. Originally bred in Scotland, the Dandie Dinmont would assist with hunts for badgers and otter. Remarkably, unlike many breeds we have today, the Dandie Dinmont from the 1700’s compared to the Dandie now, are almost completely identical. Breeders have worked very hard to maintain the high standards of this breed and ensure that they have the desired temperament and appearance.

 

The Dandie Dinmont was the first terrier recorded to be given a name, separating it from the other terriers. Up until then, all terrier-type dogs were simply just called terriers. In the early 1800’s, there was a novel written called ‘Guy Mannering’ by Walter Scott. Walter was a proud owner of several Dandie Dinmont Terriers and decided to include them in his novel. In ‘Guy Mannering’, one of the characters was named Dandie Dinmont and this character took his little tan and grey terrier dogs everywhere he went. When people read this book, they wanted their very own little Dandie Dinmont terrier too!

 

With new breeds on the rise, the Dandie became less and less popular to own as they were no longer the new craze. Die hard Dandie Dinmont enthusiasts and breeders have worked hard to keep this wonderful breed going, but even so, anyone looking to own a Dandie will likely have to purchase from a breeder in Scotland and be put on about a two year waiting list.

 

Although from the terrier group (who are known for their high energy), the Dandie is surprisingly low-key and with about two walks a day, he is quite content to spend the rest of his time on the couch. They get along amazingly with other dogs. Once they find a doggy friend they like, good luck calling him in for dinner! Dandie’s are big goofballs that love to play for hours upon hours.

 

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a non-shedding dog, but he will still require trips to the groomer to have his hair trimmed to the Dandie hair cut or for an all over shave. The Dandie hair cut leaves a large ‘topknot’ on the Dandie’s head (almost like he’s wearing a large hat!). Because this terrier is built with such short legs, their stomach is very low to the ground and will get dirty often! Be sure to always have some pooch shampoo stocked at home!

 

This little terrier is known for his ability to adapt too many different situations very easily. They aren’t fussy dogs, as long as they get time to run outside for a bit every day, they are quite content living in an apartment or condo.

 

If you’re ready to bring an easy going but playful dog into your home, be sure to get in touch with a Dandie Dinmont breeder or rescue! Although there may be a long wait time till your little guy comes home, it will be worth having this wonderful dog in your life!

Dog Friendly Birthday Cake

dog eating birthday cake

Looking for ways to make your wonderful dog’s birthday even more special? Why not make him/ her a homemade birthday cake (completely safe for dogs to eat!). Here is a simple recipe to make your dog’s birthday unforgettable!

 

Makes one 8??? round cake

 

Cake

1 cup whole wheat flour

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 cup natural peanut butter

3/4 cup applesauce

1/2 cup pumpkin puree (not pumpkin pie filling!)

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1 egg

 

Frosting

1/4 cup plain Greek yogurt

1/2 cup natural peanut butter

 

To make the cake, grease an 8??? round spring form cake pan. Whisk your dry ingredients together (whole wheat flour and baking soda). In a separate bowl combine the wet ingredients together (peanut butter, applesauce, pumpkin puree, vegetable oil and egg). Combine your wet ingredients with the dry ingredients until just comes together (don’t overmix). Bake for 30-40 min at 350 degrees F.  Cake is done when a toothpick inserted into centre comes out clean.

 

When the cake is cool, whip together the greek yogurt and peanut butter until thoroughly combined and use as frosting for the cake. If you want to go a step further and personalize your pet’s cake, you can melt down some carob chips to pipe ‘Happy Birthday’.

 

Even though this cake is delicious, make sure your dog doesn’t eat too much at once! A 1/8 slice of this cake is a reasonable serving size for a medium-large breed dog. To ensure you don’t have so much leftover, invite some doggy friends to share in your dog’s birthday festivities! Just be sure to check for any doggie allergies first!

Breed of the Week: Chinese Crested

chinese crested

Our not so fluffy breed this week is the Chinese Crested Dog. If fur all over the house is a big concern for you, you may be interested in the Chinese Crested Dog! They are mostly hairless and can be sweet little companions to the right owner.

 

Although one would assume the Chinese Crested originated from China, which is surprisingly false. The origin is still much debated but most experts believe the breed to have originated either in Africa or South America as both continents have very similar native breeds. Some people would also argue that they have to have originated from Mexico because of their similarity to another hairless dog native to Mexico (the Xoloitzcuintli). Apparently when the breed started to become popular, many Chinese merchant ships would have Chinese Crested on board with them, thus giving the false impression that China is where they originated from. The breed became more popular as people were very curious about this breed and its very noticeable lack of hair.

 

The standard for the hairless Chinese Crested Dog is to have no hair on the body, some hair on the face, neck and feet. Chinese Crested Dogs also come in a variety known as the ‘powderpuff’ and looks like a completely different dog breed! The powderpuff has thick, soft fur all over its body. Even though the hairless variety is typically more desired, the continuation of the Chinese Crested breed depends on the powderpuffs! Breeders have said that when two hairless Chinese Crested’s are bred together, there is a high risk of the litter not surviving in utero. So when breeding, you need to combine a hairless Chinese Crested with a Powder Puff to produce a healthy litter. Within that litter, there will be both powder puff varieties as well as the hairless variety. You could also breed two powder puff varieties together, but then you would be unlikely to produce any hairless varieties in the litter (and the hairless is more popular/desired).

 

Chinese Crested Dogs love following their owner everywhere. They often become very bonded to one person and can be quite standoffish with strangers. Although a gentle breed, the Chinese Crested is generally not a fan of being messed with by young kids or rough housed by rambunctious puppies and can become aggressive just like any dog when overly stressed. Owners should definitely socialize their Chinese Crested early on with strangers and other dogs. It would also be wise to teach the Chinese Crested how to stay calm instead of reacting aggressively in stressful situations. You can do this by working with them on confidence building exercises as well as being near stimulating situations (such as a puppy walking by) and teaching your Chinese Crested to focus on you and stay calm. This will eventually help them learn how to stay calm on their own.

 

Chinese Crested dogs are not overly active, they enjoy staying on the warm living room couch all day! They only require basic exercising, about 1 or 2 long walks a day depending on the dog’s health and age. Even though they enjoy lounging around, you’d be surprised how fast they can run! They will often get sprints of high energy where they run around as fast as they can for a short while, then lazy the rest of the day!

 

The Chinese Crested Dog is a loveable little friend for the owner who enjoys having a little shadow follow them around. Although mostly easy-going, they do get their high-energy moments! They require a good amount of socializing to ensure they enjoy their time spent with other people and doggy friends. With their fascinating breeding requirements to continue the breed, and their vastly different varieties, you can be sure you’ll have one of the most interesting breeds in the neighbourhood!