Breed of the Week: American Foxhound

american foxhound

The American Foxhound is one of the oldest American Dog Breeds. Although not a suitable apartment dog, this breed is a fantastic hunter as well as a gentle and easy-going cuddler!

 

The American Foxhound breed was developed in the late 1700’s, but the ancestor breeds (various other hound-type dogs) were brought over to America in the early 1600’s. The American Foxhound that we recognise today, was bred in Virginia, so it is no wonder that it is the state’s official dog breed! The breed was specifically bred to hunt foxes, often the American grey and red foxes. Today, the breed is still almost always used as a working dog. Either helping on the farm carrying heavy loads for the farmer (as this breed has a lot of strength and stamina), as hunting companions (used for tracking foxes), or competing in scent detection trials. This breed hates to be bored so it is best to only get this dog if you have a routine job for them to do.

 

Being a hound, this breed will definitely alert you with that typically hound ‘baying’ whenever he hears a noise. For this reason (as well as their high energy level), this breed is not a good option for small living spaces. The American Foxhound gets very bonded to their owners and enjoy working side by side with them. This breed is typically standoffish with strangers, and should be socialized early to prevent any fear or aggression towards strangers. They typically get along great with young kids, they can get along with other pets such as cats when heavily socialized to them, but they do have a prey drive so you should always use your best judgment.

 

They can be quite stubborn dogs when it comes to training. You should always stay calm, positive and patient with this breed. These dogs respond well to positive training methods, as well as they appreciate being given a reason to what you’ve asked of them. If you ask an American Foxhound to sit, they will look at you first almost like their asking “but why should I sit???? (usually cookies are a good enough reason!). Just be sure to not use too many training treats as this breed loves their food and can easily become overweight if not managed carefully.

 

Grooming needs for the Foxhound are very low maintenance. Being short-haired, they only require brushing maybe once a week. As they are often outdoors, they may need a few more wipe down than other dogs to keep them from tracking mud in the house!

 

The American Foxhound is a sweet and gentle breed, loyal to their family. They will spend all day outside if they are allowed, and their grooming needs are very low maintenance. Ensure that they don’t pig out on too many cookies and that they are getting enough exercise so that your Foxhound stays happy and healthy!

Breed of the Week: Tibetan Spaniel

tibetan spaniel

Our confident, pint-sized breed this week is the adventurous Tibetan Spaniel. These furry little guys share their ancestors with Pekingese, Pug and the Japanese Chin. They are intelligent and very trainable dogs suitable to confident owners.

 

The Tibetan Spaniel breed originated in the Himalayan mountains of Tibet, approximately 2,000 years ago. They were used mostly as companion dogs for the Monks, but were also keen watchdogs. The Tibetan Spaniel would sit for hours on top of a hill near the monastery, and alert the monks by barking if they saw anyone coming.

 

Although with their history you may expect the Tibetan Spaniel to be somewhat of a guard dog, in reality they are all bark and (typically) no bite. They make great watch dogs and will do lots of barking to alert you, but a well-balanced Tibetan Spaniel should never show any signs of aggression even to strangers. Typically, these dogs are pretty aloof around new people, they really light up when their owners are around. They are very loyal dogs that love to spend time with the people they’ve bonded to. Much like cats, they quite enjoy looking out the window for hours at a time, just watching people walking by. Just be sure they don’t lie by the window all day! These little guys need daily walks just like any other dog. They don’t require a lot of exercise, but still need to be active every day for their physical and mental well-being.

 

With their flat faces, the Tibetan Spaniel is known as a brachycephalic breed. So be sure that they don’t over exert themselves or are out too long in hot weather as their short muzzles can make it difficult to breath under these conditions.

 

The Tibetan Spaniel is a very intelligent and confident breed and can sometimes be a little stubborn. They are also extremely sensitive and intuitive to their owner’s mood. With all of this in mind, their training sessions should be done with a lot of patience and consistency. Avoid using any harsh training methods with this breed. The best method for training a Tibetan Spaniel is to first spend quality time together and really strengthen your bond, this will make training sessions much more enjoyable and productive!

 

To maintain the natural beauty of the Tibetan Spaniel, the owner should never trim the dog’s hair, other than the feet. Brushing should be done weekly as well as combing out the finer hair on their face. Depending on your particular Tibetan Spaniel, if they have large facial wrinkles, ensure to keep these clean by wiping them out with a pet safe wet wipe.

 

These compact little companions make great additions to almost any family. With their small size, they are suitable for city living. Using gentle and consistent training, the Tibetan Spaniel can grow to be a well-mannered watchdog and family member.

Breed of the Week: German Shepherd- Best in Show!

german shepherd

The results are in! The winner of this year’s Westminster Dog Show is the German Shepherd! It’s no wonder this great breed took home the big title. Let’s take a closer look at what makes the German Shepherd such a stand out breed!

 

The German Shepherd breed was developed in Germany in the late 1800’s. They belong to the herding group as their original purpose was to guard and herd sheep. The original German Shepherd was very different looking to the Shepherd we know and love today. German Shepherds before World War II typically rough coats and short tails. By cross-breeding various sheep dog breeds in Germany, the German Shepherd was created with the intent to have a dog to guard sheep with very high stamina so they were able to herd sheep for longer periods of time (compared to the other sheep dogs at that time).

 

Being a working dog, German Shepherds should only go to suitable families or individuals that have active lifestyles and plan to train and be around their dog for a lot of the day. German Shepherds absolutely love spending time with their owners, so they would do great with an individual who can bring their dog to work. Being bred for high stamina, it can sometimes take a lot to tucker out these dogs, so be sure to switch it up and not let your Shepherd get bored! Go to the dog park one day, a hike the next, etc. It is also very important to give your German Shepherd mentally stimulating activities or problem-solving games as they are a fairly intelligent breed and are happiest when both their body and mind are tired.

 

The German Shepherd does require a lot of brushing to ensure his coat stays healthy and to help keep the fur off your couch! They have a thick double coat that sheds year round, a slicker brush is recommended for the German Shepherd to really get through that thick fur. Be sure to talk to your groomer before using the slicker brush, if used incorrectly it can scratch your dog’s skin. German Shepherds generally come in the black and tan colouring that you are probably most familiar seeing; but they can also come in many other colours such as all black, all white, or black and red.

 

The German Shepherd can get along great with young kids as well as other pets. Depending on their training and early socialization, most German Shepherds will get along with everyone and only a little standoffish with strangers. They do have protective instincts so they will act if they feel they or their family are being threatened.

 

The wonderful German Shepherd is one of the most recognisable breeds in the world. They can be a great family pet to an active family. Just as any dog breed, they need training and proper early socialization. The German Shepherd also requires lots of brushing (about 3-4 times a week). If you aren’t phased by all that brushing and are looking for a loving companion, the German Shepherd may be right for you!

Breed of the Week: Dandie Dinmont Terrier

dandie dinmont terrier

Here’s a breed most people haven’t heard of, the Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Known as the gentleman of the terrier group, this breed is very rare and it is a long and thorough process to own one of these dogs. Read on to find out why this dog is so rare and what differs them from the rest of the terrier group.

 

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is one of the oldest recorded breeds in the world, going back as far as the 1700’s. Originally bred in Scotland, the Dandie Dinmont would assist with hunts for badgers and otter. Remarkably, unlike many breeds we have today, the Dandie Dinmont from the 1700’s compared to the Dandie now, are almost completely identical. Breeders have worked very hard to maintain the high standards of this breed and ensure that they have the desired temperament and appearance.

 

The Dandie Dinmont was the first terrier recorded to be given a name, separating it from the other terriers. Up until then, all terrier-type dogs were simply just called terriers. In the early 1800’s, there was a novel written called ‘Guy Mannering’ by Walter Scott. Walter was a proud owner of several Dandie Dinmont Terriers and decided to include them in his novel. In ‘Guy Mannering’, one of the characters was named Dandie Dinmont and this character took his little tan and grey terrier dogs everywhere he went. When people read this book, they wanted their very own little Dandie Dinmont terrier too!

 

With new breeds on the rise, the Dandie became less and less popular to own as they were no longer the new craze. Die hard Dandie Dinmont enthusiasts and breeders have worked hard to keep this wonderful breed going, but even so, anyone looking to own a Dandie will likely have to purchase from a breeder in Scotland and be put on about a two year waiting list.

 

Although from the terrier group (who are known for their high energy), the Dandie is surprisingly low-key and with about two walks a day, he is quite content to spend the rest of his time on the couch. They get along amazingly with other dogs. Once they find a doggy friend they like, good luck calling him in for dinner! Dandie’s are big goofballs that love to play for hours upon hours.

 

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a non-shedding dog, but he will still require trips to the groomer to have his hair trimmed to the Dandie hair cut or for an all over shave. The Dandie hair cut leaves a large ‘topknot’ on the Dandie’s head (almost like he’s wearing a large hat!). Because this terrier is built with such short legs, their stomach is very low to the ground and will get dirty often! Be sure to always have some pooch shampoo stocked at home!

 

This little terrier is known for his ability to adapt too many different situations very easily. They aren’t fussy dogs, as long as they get time to run outside for a bit every day, they are quite content living in an apartment or condo.

 

If you’re ready to bring an easy going but playful dog into your home, be sure to get in touch with a Dandie Dinmont breeder or rescue! Although there may be a long wait time till your little guy comes home, it will be worth having this wonderful dog in your life!

Choosing the Right Groomer

Red Toy Poodle puppy sits on a white background

 

Bought your first pup and looking for a new groomer to maintain their stylish looks? Or maybe you’ve been to other groomers already and are not completely satisfied? We’ve put together a few tips to help you find the right groomer for you and your four-legged friends!

 

Look Around!          Did you notice that gorgeous looking poodle walking down the street? Or maybe that handsome Bichon Frise? Next time you see a well-groomed dog at the dog park, ask the owner where they go! A great looking groom is free advertisement for a groomer and shows you their skill level. Try to keep an eye out for dogs similar looking to your dog to get a better idea of how the groomer will be with your particular dog. Every groomer will have some breeds they are better at. Just because your groomer can do a great groom on a cocker spaniel, doesn’t mean they will do a great groom on your miniature schnauzer.

 

Ask Questions!       When you are entrusting someone to maintain your pet’s lovely coat, it’s normal to be a little anxious for your first few grooms. So prepare a list of all your questions ahead of time and ask the groomer before your first groom. Find out how familiar they are with grooming your particular dog’s breed, how many years they’ve been grooming for, their full list of services, etc. Think of as many questions as you can to really get to know your groomer and what type of service you will be provided with.

 

Check Certifications!         You always want to be sure that your groomer is properly certified for all the services that they offer. Many groomers are self-taught and/ or self-employed, but they are still encouraged to become certified as a groomer/ pet stylist in Canada. As well, they should be certified for several other services if they offer them, such as treating fleas and ticks. Beware if your groomer offers any services that require anesthesia such as teeth scaling (different from teeth cleaning which is typically done with dog toothpaste and toothbrush). These procedures should be left to your veterinarian for the health and safety of your dog. Complications can arise with these more invasive services/ procedures and you want to be sure there is a team of trained staff to be there for your pet as well as the proper medical equipment found in a vet’s office.

 

Whether you want a new ‘do’ for your new Bouvier, or trying to find a calm groomer for your senior coton du tulear; these tips are sure to help you and your dog find the most compatible groomer for you!

Breed of the Week: Clumber Spaniel

clumber-spaniel

Our featured breed this week is the wonderful Clumber Spaniel. A dog known for going at their own pace, many would be surprised to learn their history and great scent detection. This dog is a lovely family companion with their laid back attitude, but can definitely get their spurts of energy too! Let’s take a closer look at this interesting breed.

 

The Clumber Spaniel was developed in the late 18th century. Hunters bred the Clumber Spaniel from other already existing breeds such as the Basset hound and the Alpine Spaniel. With their ancestors being the basset hound, it is no wonder they have great scent detection and were used for hunting mostly birds. The owners of Clumber Spaniels were typically people of nobility, who enjoyed hunting for sport rather than a necessity. The Clumber Spaniel is thought to be a very English dog breed as they were even named after Clumber park in Nottinghamshire, England.

 

A day in the life of a Clumber Spaniel is generally very easy going and relaxed. They like to take their time on walks, make sure they investigate every new scent thoroughly. You won’t often find a Clumber Spaniel running around like a Border Collie (although they do get spurts of energy just like any dog). The Clumber spaniel is thought to be the gentle giant of the spaniels. They are quite sturdy with the female typically weighing 55lbs and the male at about 70lbs. Clumber spaniels typically get along well with other dogs and cats too if socialized early. Because of their hunting instincts they may not do well with small animals such as guinea pigs or parrots. The Clumber spaniel adapts well to apartment living and typically only require 2-3 walks a day.

 

The Clumber Spaniel may not be the best match for a first time dog owner. Although they are naturally very loving and gentle, they can be quite stubborn and difficult to train. Most Clumber Spaniels are food motivated so it may help your training sessions if you have a pocket full of treats! They do require some grooming to keep them looking their best. Once or twice a month to the grooming to get hair trimming, as well as regular bathing, brushing and nail clipping. You may find the Clumber Spaniel needs more bathing than other breeds as they love to get dirty. Especially if they catch a good scent, they will run through dirt, mud, anything to pursue that scent!

 

Families looking for a low key dog that loves to curl up on the couch would do well with a Clumber Spaniel. They are such loving dogs (even though they can sometimes be a little stubborn!). But beware when on your walk or letting your Clumber Spaniel off leash as they tend to forget the rest of the world when they’re on a good scent!

Breed of the Week: Schipperke

schipperke

Have you heard about our latest breed of the week? The Schipperke! This little black fox-looking dog is not super well known but wins over your heart at first play! They are active little dogs with a constant smile on their face. Read on to learn more about the Schipperke!

 

The Schipperke was originally bred in Belgium as a very effective watchdog. Their ancestors are a larger breed with similar looks, known as the ‘Leauvennar’.

 

With their natural instinct to watch and protect, you can be sure you are safe with the Schipperke watching your family and home. They are definitely a small dog with a huge personality and confidence, with these characteristics they definitely need to be heavily socialized with people to ensure they don’t become standoffish or aggressive towards new people.

 

These little guys never run out of energy! To keep them happy and healthy you will need to spend a lot of time together exercising as well as keeping them mentally stimulated (they are a very intelligent breed). They would do very well in agility competitions. You could also teach them games to get out some energy at the same time as giving them mental stimulation. A great game to play with your Schipperke would be ‘search & rescue’. This game consists of having your dog facing away from where you will be hiding a toy. Once you’ve hidden the toy, tell them ‘find it’, and once they have found it and brought it back to you, give them praise or a treat! This helps to drain some energy, keep them mentally stimulated, build their confidence (the pride they get when they’ve found the toy), and strengthening your bond!

 

The Schipperke typically has an all-black coat, but can also come in brown (chocolate), cream, black and tan and red. Although the other colours (aside from black) can be quite rare to find. This dog really does look like a little black fox with their furry bodies and tiny little legs. As well as their fox-like pointy nose and ears. When they open the mouths they almost look like they are smiling at you!  They will require trips to the vet for a hair trim about once a month, along with all their other basic grooming needs (brushing, nail trimming, etc.).

 

The Schipperke can do well in a household with respectful children (not too rowdy, so possibly not great with very young kids). Just as with any breed, they should always be socialized early. Whether living with a single person or a family, this dog just wants to live an active and busy lifestyle. Schipperke owners quickly bond with their wonderful and sweet companions and always feel protected with them around!