Natural Ways to Deter Fleas

puppy running

One thing all dog owners can agree on, no one likes fleas! As small as they are, they can be a big nuisance to not only your dog, but your whole household. It is recommended that you discuss with your vet the best flea prevention for your dog. Most people choose to use topical applications of medicated flea control. This week we are looking at some natural methods to help protect against fleas.

 

Apple Cider Vinegar          Who knew the wonder remedy has benefits for dogs too? Some dog owners have found adding a little bit of apple cider vinegar to their dog’s water can help to deter fleas. Approximately 1 tsp is enough for a 40lb dog, diluted in about 1 Litre of water. If you find your dog doesn’t like the taste, you can put a 50/50 mixture of apple cider vinegar and water into a spray bottle and just spray down your dog’s fur. Depending on how comfortable you are with the smell of apple cider vinegar, you can also spray down the dog bed and any other furniture he typically goes on.

 

DIY Flea Bath           If it’s getting to be around flea season, you can pre-emptively give your dog a homemade flea bath. Just combine 2 cups of water with the juice of 1 lemon and about ½ cup of his normal doggy shampoo. Mix well, and use in place of his regular pet shampoo during his next bath. Your dog will smell lemony fresh while also keeping pesky bugs at bay!

 

Go To The Beach!               Many dog owners swear by the use of salt on fleas. If you’re worried that maybe you’ve seen one or two fleas around, take your dog to go swimming at a dog friendly beach! The salt from the water may ‘dehydrate’ and kill the fleas. Because this method hasn’t been studied, this method is not recommended if you’ve seen many fleas on your dog. Be sure not to do this method too often, as the salt will also start to dehydrate your dogs skin and dry out his hair.

We hope that these natural remedies help you and your dog stay happy, healthy and free of fleas!

Breed of the Week: Scottish Deerhound

scottish deerhound

Our featured breed this week is the majestic and always happy Scottish Deerhound. These long-legged dogs have a very quiet nature, they much prefer to avoid any chaos, and watch from a comfy couch instead!

 

The Scottish Deerhound breed dates back as far as the 13th century. Back then, only people who were Dukes or higher ranking could own this breed. During the 13th century there was a large decline of deer in England, most of them had migrated to the Scottish Highlands resulting in a very high concentration of deer in that area. The Scottish Deerhound breed was developed to help control the population of deer. These dogs are very long and lean, shaped almost to mimic the deer so that they could effectively track down, chase and hunt them. During the 18th century, breech-loading rifles gained popularity, and more and more deer hunters were using guns instead of depending so heavily on the Scottish Deerhound. During World War I, the breed almost became extinct, and they still remain to be recognised as a very rare breed.

 

The Scottish Deerhound is often described as graceful and undemanding. They are rarely ‘needy’ and generally don’t have many issues with separation anxiety.  An adult Scottish Deerhound is graceful and very fast. Although they can run like nobody’s business, they are also very comfortable and happy to lounge indoors on the couch with you. When they do get outside, make sure it is a very large area they can run around and that it is fully enclosed as reliable recall can sometimes be an issue with this breed. They need daily activity to stretch those legs and get out some energy.

 

Scottish Deerhound puppies and teens are often not as graceful as the adults. Similar to a young Great Dane, Scottish Deerhound puppies can be quite awkward when running and playing as they are still getting used to their very long legs. Scottish Deerhound pups need extra exercise for all that puppy energy, and they love to play with everyone!

 

Although very intelligent and a great natural temperament, the Scottish Deerhound can be a bit stubborn to train. They need someone who is very consistent and patient to help communicate what is expected of them. They require a lot of socialization around small animals otherwise they are often likely to chase small, fast moving animals (sometimes including small dogs and cats!).

 

With their wire-hair coat, they require brushing once or twice a week. They can easily get tangles in their hair after romping in the yard, and easy fix is to rub in some baby oil to help loosen any knots or tangles. They do require hair trimming, but they frequency will depend on each individual dog, typically every 3-6 months.

 

The Scottish Deerhound is a gentle quiet breed that loves to run fast. Although they may not always come back when called, they make great family pets and generally get along with everyone they meet. This majestic breed makes a wonderful addition to laid back families with lots of open, fenced in space to run around!

Water Safety Tips for Dogs

lab swimming

With the weather getting warmer, many of us will be trying to get up to the cottage for some relaxation by the water. Many dogs love the cottage life, jumping in the lake and going for a swim! Feeling that breeze through their fur when they’re next to you on the boat. This week we will be discussing how to keep your pooch happy and safe when playing in or near the water.

 

Not All Dogs Love to Swim          While there are many natural born swimmer breeds such as the Newfoundlander and Chesapeake Bay Retriever, there are also some breed who don’t often take to swimming very well. Breeds with short little legs and/ or short snouts can have trouble paddling strong enough to keep themselves up when in water. Some examples of these breeds are Pugs and Corgi’s. Due to their shorter legs, it can be somewhat rare to see these types of dogs enjoying deep water as they aren’t physical built for swimming. Of course, there’s always an exception to the rule and some shorter legged dogs are in fact great swimmers. It is always a smart idea to stay nearby if your little legged dog wants to try swimming, just in case you need to help him out.

 

Life Jackets and Vests                   There are many places online that make breed and size specific life jackets for any dog breed. If your dog isn’t a confident swimmer, it may be a good idea to put a life vest on if you know you will be near the water. If you plan on taking your dog on a boat ride, no matter what breed or swimming experience he has, he should be wearing a life vest. Just in case you happen to go over a big wave or if your dog unexpectedly reacts to something while on the boat, you always want to make sure he is wearing a life vest for any unexpected moments. These doggy life vest often come with durable handles on the top so you have a much easier time pulling him out of the water if needed.

 

Keep Your Dog Within Eyesight You never know what your dog can get into. He may be enjoying himself in the water so much, that he ends up going too far out. This prevents you from being able to reach him in time if there’s any sort of emergency. Be sure that your dog knows to stay close and within your eyesight. If you’re with others, have them help keep a look out, the more eyes the better when it comes to safety!

 

Check The Water First                  We all know that it can take some time for large bodies of water to warm up near the beginning of summer. If the water is too cold, it can put your dog at risk for hypothermia. Some dogs that were bred to swim and hunt in the water have a double coat, helping to protect their body from cold water. For dogs that don’t have this double coat, it doesn’t take long for hypothermia to set in. A good rule before your dog goes swimming, is to check the water yourself first! Take a quick dip to check the water first. Check around where you are to make sure there aren’t any warning signs posted for things like jellyfish to ensure your dog won’t have any unexpected encounters.

 

Some dogs can’t get enough of the water while others prefer to stay on land. Whatever your dog’s preference is, make sure he stays safe this summer by following our water safety tips!

Making New Doggy Friends

dog friends

Are you looking for a new best friend for your pup? Has he been looking a little bored or lonely lately? Well, if you aren’t looking to add another dog to your family, a great solution is to find new playmates for your pup! We’ve put together our favourite tips on making new doggy friends.

 

Neutral Territory

One of the great things about going to the dog park, is that very rarely will you find dog’s being protective of the dog park itself. When you bring another dog into your home, your dog may feel he needs to protect the home and instead of trying to be friends, he may worry that his home is being threatened by this visitor. Having dogs meet on ‘neutral ground’ takes away those feelings of having to protect or guard the area and makes it much easier for dogs to play together and bond.

 

Similar Minds

When looking for a new best friend for Spot, you may find that your dog often gravitates to playing with certain breeds or certain sizes of dogs. This is not to say that opposites don’t sometimes attract in the dog world; but your border collie may not be having fun playing chase with a pug if the pug can’t keep up! Often times this is most true with highly active breeds such as border collies or dalmatians. They enjoy chasing and being chased….and going really really fast! So if their doggy buddy can’t keep up, you may need to look around for other high energy play times to really tire your dog out and help him get the most out of playtime.

 

Positivity

It can be very beneficial to use positive association when trying to help your dog bond with a new friend. Giving affection or praise after your dog had a long play session with his new buddy, will really enforce the thought of ‘I had a lot of fun today with that new dog and my owner was happy with me! Good things happen when I play with that dog!???. Be careful though to not create any jealousy between the dogs. If they are in the middle of interacting with each other, it may not be the best time to offer a treat as this could cause jealousy in the other dog and he may react aggressively, creating a negative experience. If you are unsure about creating positive associations for your dog, it is best to consult a certified dog behaviourist for advice.

 

With these helpful tips your pooch is sure to become a social butterfly!

Dog Breed Classifications: Part 1

dog-line-up

Ever wonder why some dogs have never ending energy while others are more inclined to lay on the couch all day? Well part of the reason is what the dog’s ancestors were bred for! Today we will look at 3 of the 7 different classifications of dogs that will give us more insight into their personalities and why they act the way they do!

 

Hounds: The hound group includes dog breeds such as beagles, Norwegian elkhounds and basset hounds. These dogs typically have more scent receptors than breeds in other groups which tells you why they are known to always be on a scent. If you are interested in bringing a hound into your family, be aware that it may be more difficult to have reliable recall as they will often be distracted by a good scent. As well as they will typically ‘bay’ instead of bark, which some people prefer but it is not for everyone. So it helps to have a fondness for that baying sound!

 

Herding: Some of the dog breeds belonging to the herding group are the Border collie, Australian cattle dog and the Collie. You will often notice right away when a herding-type dog is playing at the dog park as their favourite way to play is chasing other dogs, mimicking their herding nature. Owners of herding dogs would be wise to ensure their dogs learn early on how to play nicely as they can sometimes be prone to nipping other dog’s ankles as this is the way their ancestors would herd livestock.  Herding dogs are generally very high energy and very intelligent so they are best suited to a family with an active lifestyle. They love to be challenged to learning new things and do great in agility competitions.

 

Toy Group: Examples of breeds from the toy group are the Chihuahua, maltese and Pekingese. These dogs were bred with the intent to have a small compact dog suitable to apartment and city living (as well as to be very cute!). These dogs do typically have that high-pitch bark so it would be wise to teach them early on to be quiet on command. You will often find toy dogs with not so great manners (of course this does not go for all toy dogs!) because their cuteness will generally let them get away with whatever trouble they get into. It is very important for owners of a dog from the toy group to look past that adorable face and ensure they are keeping up with their manners (not barking, jumping up on people, nipping, etc.).

 

Now that we’ve had a look at 3 of the 7 types of dog classifications, be sure to check in next week for the remaining 4!

Dog Park Etiquette

            The dog park is a great place to have your dog get out some excess energy and meet new dogs as well as new people. When at a dog park, it is important to know the proper dog park etiquette to keep it an enjoyable place for everyone. We’ve put together 3 easy tips to help you and your furry friend get the most out of your time at the dog park!

Scoop It!

Nobody at the dog park wants to clean up after someone else’s pet, so be sure to watch your dog(s) carefully if they are doing their business. You are completely responsible to clean up any messes your pet leaves. This ensures a better experience at the dog park for everyone. If you notice someone else’s dog doing their business, it is common dog park courtesy to politely let the owner know.

Keep Up With Vaccinations!

Be sure to always have your dog up to date with his vaccinations so that he (as well as the other dogs at the dog park) are much less likely to contract anything. Many dog parks also now require that your dog be spayed or neutered; this reduces any accidental pregnancies and many people believe it reduces the chances of fighting amongst male dogs.

If your dog has recently had a stomach bug or other small illness, it is best to keep them home just as you would keep a small child home from daycare if not feeling 100%. This also goes for fleas, ticks, etc. Dog parks should be thought of like a children’s daycare, you want to make sure they are up to it as well as preventing passing on anything to the other dogs.

Interact With Your Dog!

The reason most people bring their dog to a dog park is to play and run with other dogs. If your dog sees you sitting on the bench looking at your phone the whole time, he may end up just hanging around you instead of playing! Or if you have a more independent dog, he may get into some trouble such as playing too rough with other dogs, digging holes, jumping fences, etc., if he knows you aren’t watching him. So be sure to keep moving around the dog park (this also helps with your dog’s recall as he will constantly be looking to where you are). This helps you be more aware of how your dog is playing with the others and ensuring he is not misbehaving as well as making sure other dogs are not being too rough with him!

If you follow these simple tips you are sure to be one of the most popular people (and dog) at the dog park!